Swansea University

An impressive development that will have the distinction of being one of the few global universities with direct access onto a beach and its own seafront promenade.



Project Detail
Safety For Design are the CDM-C for the Swansea University’s Bay Campus, which is being delivered on St. Modwen’s 65 acre former BP Transit site in Neath Port Talbot on the eastern approach into Swansea.As the CDM-C for phase 1a and 1b of the project we are working with main construction companies Vinci Construction, Morgan Sindall and Galliford Try as well as other contractors ensuring communication and coordination, particularly in design and delivery of the project ‘Soft Landing’ process.The Campus will provide academic, student accommodation and research space. Whilst development work will continue up until 2020, the majority of the works will be completed during this first phase of construction and open for the first intake of students in September 2015.

Facilities based at the Bay Campus include the College of Engineering and the School of Management. There will be a Tower Information Centre which will be home to central support services for students, a state of the art library and resource centre, the Students’ Union, facilities and meeting rooms  and an impressive Great Hall will house an auditorium for 800, lecture theatres and a cafe offering magnificent views across the Swansea Bay towards Gower and Baglan Bay. There will be extensive catering provision throughout the campus to include cafes, bars and a restaurant, retail units include a mini market, laundrette and cash points. All of this will be in addition to recreational sporting facilities and a beach, for all to enjoy.

 

Professor Jim Wickerson – Rolls Royce recently visited the Bay Camps as a visiting lecturer to the College of Engineering. These are his comments on the Bay Campus design.:

“Whilst I am still feeling inspired, here is my nomination for the whole Bay Campus – please pass on to the people who have made the campus if it might please anybody:
“It is the Bay Campus as a whole that should be nominated, for the Stirling Prize. It was utterly uplifting to me from my moment of my first arrival. It is an eclectic and confident mix of building styles – it does not try to be all modern or all classical – it makes a joyful selection of stone, more stone, brick, glass, more brick and metal. It plays a happy tune with its building shapes – in some ways as if a super-intelligent child has been the architect. It has the confidence to not be symmetrical in all its details. It has the powerful presence of its clock tower – a tower that looks like some other clock tower seen before, but is actually all its own personality. There are ‘random’ balconies coming from unspecial rooms – but they are not really random. Then it has its use of its location – the sea is just out of view behind the dunes, but we know it is there. Everything is good – even the long long little white wall that forms the boundary of the campus to the dunes – it snake along, surely with the intent of making the students think of their future and the future of all the students to follow them, and before them. On its top it has occasional pairs of curved wooden bench planks for friends and lovers to sit on in a friendly but still widely spaced poetry – generations of young people will come to sit on that wall and makes plans for a better future. Lastly – the Great Hall. Every university should have one – but many do not. It is strong, big, secure, beautiful and, again, confidently modern and classical in the same time. It will wear in the sand storms from the sea as it graceful ages. Students will remember graduating from it. It will have a sustained presence in their minds.”